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Cubes Magazine
Cubes Magazine

A Warm Workspace Welcome: The Toll Office By Geyer

Honest, open and warm, Geyer’s striking seven-storey office for Toll Global Logistics in Tuas steers clear from the opulence in favour of a variety of comfortable work settings that promote wellness.



BY Felicia Toh

6 June, 2018


Toll Global Logistics began humbly in 1888 when Albert Toll hauled coal by horse and cart in Australia. A hundred and twenty-five years later, the company employs around 40,000 people across 50 countries. Geyer was commissioned to design their strikingly new seven-storey office complex headquartered in Tuas, Singapore.

 Toll’s vision for the new workplace was to connect people, customers and the wider community. They also expressed that they did not want to create an opulent environment, but an open, collaborative space where all the staff from the warehouse department to executives would feel at ease.

The entrance lobby employs black industrial mesh ceilings and concrete wall surfaces, which are balanced by caramel brown leather upholstery and earthy green wall panels. The overall visual effect speaks of an honest, industrial space that is invitingly warm, rather unlike many industrial buildings.

A black steel staircase occupies the central void connecting Level 6 and 7, leading to a lounge space enlivened by lush planting, oak-toned flooring and vibrantly upholstered furniture. A large café serves as gathering grounds for the entire office- the heart of social interactions where parties and casual conversations create a lively buzz.

Workplaces are the latest frontier for design innovation globally, with many businesses rethinking definitions of work and productivity. As a leading consultancy for innovative workplace design, Geyer observes that clients are increasingly eliminating enclosed offices and requesting for workspaces that support a variety of work settings, such as collaborative areas, quiet focus zones and relaxation spaces.

Well-being has also risen in priority in recent years, with more clients incorporating greenery and amenities such as sit to stand desks, gyms and game zones within their offices. Workplace research has revealed that happy people are more productive, and workplace designs are following suit to support these findings.

Geyer takes a common approach to all their projects, making it a point to begin by observing and asking deep questions about the organizational objectives. Once these objectives are set, all their design ideas are measured against them. These require rigour, as it is easy for an organization to agree on strong objectives such as ‘sustainability’, yet subsequently neglect to make choices against these objectives as the projects proceed.

This essential discipline might just be the ingredient garnering Geyer recognition in the sphere of workplace design – winning them prestigious projects such as PwC’s 15,000 square metres workplace at Marina One, Singapore as well as the 30,000-square-metre Citi office in Jakarta.

 

Photography by Owen Raggett. 

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